Kinazi Cassava Plant



    Ruhango District,
    Kinazi Road

    shopping-bag

    +250 724 797 703

    Background History

    Incorporation

    Kinazi Cassava Plant Limited (KCP Ltd) is a cassava processing company located in Ruhango District, Southern Province of Rwanda. KCP Ltd was conceived and funded by the Government of Rwanda through the Ministry of Finance and Economic Planning (MINECOFIN) and Rwanda Development Bank (BRD Plc). 

    The company is duly incorporated under the laws of the Republic of Rwanda and is registered with the Rwanda Development Board (RDB). The Plant was officially commissioned on April 16th, 2012 and its first sales were recording in June 2012. KCP Ltd was established to provide an avenue for cassava crop value addition and boost the economic activity of the Southern Province. Communities surrounding the Plant were encouraged and funded, through BRD Plc, to grow cassava on large scale to meet the Plant’s high demand for fresh cassava roots. The Plant has a daily production capacity of 30 Tons of cassava flour with an estimated need of 100 Tons of fresh cassava roots.

    Post Inauguration

    In 2014, there was an outbreak of farm Cassava Brown Streak disease (CBSD) locally known as Kabore which destroyed all cassava plantations mainly in the Southern Province, causing a crisis in the supply of raw materials to the Plant. The company was forced to outsource, at a high cost, fresh cassava roots from neighbouring countries, mainly Tanzania. 

    The CBS Disease’ impact on the company operations lasted for a minimum of 4 years despite the disease affecting a single agriculture season. Late 2014 and early 2015, a new crop variety (NASE 14) was distributed to farmers by the Rwanda Agriculture Board (RAB). Following this Government intervention, the Plant has no longer faced challenges of raw materials shortage since 2018.

    Low utilisation capacity

    The average capacity utilization in 2012 was 11%, 7% in 2013, 19% in 2014, 12% in 2015 and 10% in 2016, 14% in 2017, 25% in 2018, 25% in 2019 and 35% in 2020. This was due to several reasons including but not limited to low farm productivity, the disease that affected cassava plantations and a lack of ready market